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Lunar Prospector: Against All Odds

[ Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 | Part 4 | Epilogue | Appendices ]

Images are all approximately 50kb in size so please be patient.

+ Figures 1-1 through 1-4

Figure 1-1, in Chapter 1-4: The original Lunar Exploration Inc. (LEI) volunteers that formed the basis of the original Lunar Prospector Engineering Team (LEI photograph). View image

Figure 1-2, in Chapter 1-4: Some of the attendees at the Critical Design Review of the Lunar Prospector Spacecraft design that was held on June 16, 1990, at the end of the OMNI Systems Inc. spacecraft design effort. Seated from right to left: Andy Abraham (OMNI), John Jordan (OMNI), Jim French (Space Studies Institute), Ian Ayton (OMNI), Bob Noteboom (Lunar Exploration Inc.) and the author (Lunar Exploration Inc.). Standing from right to left: Jim Burke (Space Studies Institute) and Wayne Stevens (OMNI) (OMNI photograph). View image

Figure 1-3, in Chapter 1-4: The OMNI, full-scale engineering model of the Lunar Prospector Spacecraft with its science instrument booms extended. The Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (GRS) and its science boom extend towards the foreground. The Magnetometer (MAG) and Electron Reflectometer (ER) and their boom extend back and to the left, with the MAG mounted on a 1-m long MAG extension boom extending upwards from the ER and their common electronics box (CPU), that together are mounted at the end of the main boom. The Neutron Spectrometer (NS) and the Alpha particle Spectrometer (APS) - both hidden behind Ian Ayton - and their boom extend back and to the right. The omni and medium gain antennas extend out the top of the model. One can also see the silvery fuel tanks inside the main structure and the dark blue solar cells mounted on the outside of the solar array drum (OMNI photograph). View image

Figure 1-4, in Chapter 1-4: The OMNI engineers standing next to the OMNI spacecraft model with its science instrument booms in the stowed position. From right to left: Wayne Stevens, OMNI’s President; Diane Pieczynski, the Communications Engineer; Asif Ansari, the Mechanical Engineer; Andy Abraham, the Controls Engineer; Mike Chobotov, the Systems Engineer and Study Manager; Vladimir Chobotov (Mike’s father) consultant; John Jordan, the Propulsion Engineer and Ian Ayton, who built the OMNI spacecraft engineering model (OMNI photograph). View image

+ Figures 1-5 through 1-10

Figure 1-5, in Chapter 1-4: Three of the senior members of the Lunar Prospector Team standing next to the OMNI spacecraft model with its science instrument booms in the stowed position. From right to left: Jim Burke and Gregg Maryniak, both from the Space Studies Institute and, the author from Lunar Exploration Inc (OMNI photograph). View image

Figure 1-6, in Chapter 1-6: Mike Lawson, President of Space Marketing Concepts of Atlanta, standing at the podium with a video showing the launch of a Soviet rocket, discusses the NPO Energia offer to launch Lunar Prospector at the Lunar Prospector Press Conference held by Lunar Exploration Inc. on October 17, 1990 in Houston. Having given our parts of the Press Conference, Preston Carter (Lunar Exploration Inc.’s Co-Chairman and Lunar Prospector’s Project Engineer, to Mike’s far left) and the author are seated to Mike’s left and I am complaining to Preston about the gross exaggerations that he and Mike had made regarding the certainty of the NPO Energia offer to launch Lunar Prospector and about the status of our fund raising activities – exaggerations that were about to backfire a few minutes after this picture was take (LEI photograph). View image

Figure 1-7, in Chapter 1-6: Preston Carter (facing the cameras), to the left of the desktop model of the Lunar Prospector Spacecraft, discussing the mission with some guests at the Post-Press Conference Reception held in Clear Lake, TX, during the evening of October 17, 1990. The author (back to the camera) and David Juist (facing the camera), a lawyer in the Clear Lake area, are discussing his generous offer to do the legal work on the Lunar Exploration Inc. contracts pro bono (LEI photograph). View image

Figure 1-8, in Chapter 1-6: The author giving a presentation on the Lunar Prospector Mission at the Post-Press Conference Reception held in Clear Lake, TX, during the evening of October 17, 1990, with desktop model of the spacecraft in the foreground (LEI photograph). View image

Figure 1-9, in Chapter 1-15: The Discovery Proposal version of the Lunar Prospector Spacecraft is depicted in this composite image orbiting above the Moon at 100 km. The image consists of an Apollo image of the Moon taken from a 100 km altitude orbit and a computer rendition of the spacecraft (Lockheed Martin image). View image

Figure 1-10, in Chapter 1-15: The full-scale engineering model of the Discovery Proposal version of the Lunar Prospector Spacecraft. Note the great similarities between this version of the spacecraft design and the OMNI design as shown in Figures 1-3, 1-4, 1-5, 1-7 and 1-8. In this picture, the Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (GRS) is on the science instrument boom nearest the camera; the Alpha Particle Spectrometer (APS, the instrument at the end of the boom) and the Neutron Spectrometer (NS, the silvery cylinders somewhat near the spacecraft that the APS) are on the science boom extending back and to the left; and the Magnetometer (MAG) and Electron Reflectometer (ER) are out of the picture on the science boon extending to the right (Lockheed Martin photograph). View image


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